Beautiful Marbled recorded in Exeter

A stunning and rare Beautiful Marbled moth (Eublemma purpurina) was recorded this week in a garden in Exwick, Exeter by Adrian Colston. This species is a scarce immigrant from continental Europe, with only around 50 ever recorded in Britain. The Exwick sighting is only the third ever in Devon, after one near Ottery St Mary in 2006 and the other near Chittlehampton in 2012. It is also a very early sighting, as the vast majority of previous British sightings have been made between August and October. Hopefully this is a good omen for a summer of exciting and beautiful moths!

Annual report for 2019 published

The Devon Moth Group Annual Report for 2019 has been published and distributed to Group members. It summarises 80,000 moth records (c.17,000 for micro-moths and c.63,000 for macro-moths) for the county last year from 286 recorders. The records have been compiled and verified by the County Moth Recorder, Dr Barry Henwood, and his fantastic team: Phil Barden, Darryl Rush, Phil Dean, Kim Leaver and Bob Heckford. Four new micro-moth species were recorded in Devon during 2019: Ectoedemia heringella, Parectopa ononidis, Monochroa palustrellus and Cochylidia implicitana. In addition, the first modern day record of Small Ranunculus was made when the moth was spotted in a pedestrian subway in Exeter. All the records will be shared with the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre and the National Moth Recording Scheme run by Butterfly Conservation. Many thanks to all the recorders who submitted sightings of moths in Devon during 2019.

Devon Moth Group Annual Report 2019

Devon Moth Group Annual Report 2019

New Devon micro-moth checklist available

A new, up-dated micro-moth checklist for Devon is now available on the Devon Moth Group website. This list, expertly produced by Devon Moth Group members Stella Beavan and Bob Heckford, includes over 1,000 species of micro-moths that have been recorded in the County. It has now been updated with recently added species and changes in scientific names, and has been reordered into the correct taxonomic order according to the Agassiz, Beavan & Heckford Checklist of the Lepidoptera of the British Isles.

The list provides a fantastic resource for anyone recording moths in Devon and DMG is extremely grateful to Stella and Bob for all their hard work creating, revising and maintaining it.

Pyrausta purpuralis (Patrick Clement)

Pyrausta purpuralis (Patrick Clement)

The Pug Moths of Devon

Among the larger moths, the pugs are notoriously tricky to identify. Some species are very distinctive, being boldly patterned and coloured, but others are definitely a challenge. Help is at hand, thanks to the publication of a new book, The Pug Moths of Devon by Phil Dean of Devon Moth Group.

Although not primarily intended as an identification guide, the new book will certainly help. It contains a detailed account of each pug moth recorded in Devon, including taxonomy, distribution maps, flight charts, and a colour photo of the adult (see example below). The Pug Moths of Devon is based on 34,000 records extracted from the Devon Moth Group database and is published in A4 format with 64 pages.

Copies cost £7.00 (+ £3.00 p&p) and can be obtained by emailing [email protected]

One Million Moth Records

Devon Moth Group is celebrating the collection of one million moth sightings across the county.

The Group, which collects and checks all sightings of moths and their caterpillars reported in the county, has amassed the impressive total since its formation in 1997. The records date back to the mid-19th century and provide a long-term view of the changing wildlife of Devon.

The landmark millionth record was of a V-Pug, a small green moth with a characteristic black v-shaped mark on its wings, which was spotted by Devon Moth Group member Kevin Johns in his Newton Abbot garden.

V-Pug (Phil Dean)

V-Pug (Phil Dean)

Moth recording plays an important role in conservation as the information gathered shows which species are flourishing and which are in danger. The sightings then identify parts of Devon where threatened and declining moths still remain so that conservation action can be targeted effectively. All of the records gathered are shared with the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre, Devon Wildlife Trust and the UK-wide National Moth Recording Scheme.

Around 1,700 moth species have been recorded in Devon, some two-thirds of the total for Britain. These include nationally important species such as the rare Scarce Blackneck, Beautiful Gothic and Devonshire Wainscot.

The V-Pug, which has the scientific name Chloroclystis v-ata, is a widespread species in Devon. Its unobtrusive caterpillars feed on the flowers of a wide variety of plants including Bramble, Dog-rose, Elder, Hawthorn and Hemp-agrimony. V-Pug moths are often found in gardens, where they are beautifully camouflaged resting against mottled foliage and algae-covered bark.

Gardeners can do a great deal to help moths, including planting a variety of moth-friendly flowers for nectar, especially native plants, keeping a few areas rough and untidy, and avoiding the use of insecticides wherever possible.

Kevin Johns, who has been a regular contributor to the Devon moth database, was delighted to learn that his V-Pug record turned out to be the one that passed the million mark. He said that it was “a brilliant surprise, really quite special”. Being retired, Kevin has many interests, moths being just one of them. He describes his garden as a small courtyard with a few shrubs and flower beds, but importantly says it is close to mature woodland which means that a good number of moths are attracted to his light-trap to be noted and released unharmed. “I’m really pleased with what I get”, he added.

Kevin Johns garden with moth-trap

Garden where the millionth moth record was made (Kevin Johns)


All the records submitted by volunteers in Devon are collated by the County Moth Recorder, Barry Henwood, who in turn passes them on to the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre whose manager, Ian Egerton, explains, “Devon Biodiversity Records Centre is a partnership-led organisation set up to gather information on Devon’s species and habitats. We ensure that biodiversity information feeds into decision-making locally and nationally, and over the last 25 years, our efforts have been underpinned significantly by the county’s huge network of volunteer recorders. Their passion and interest in specific species has created much of the data we now hold, and the level of knowledge and expertise within groups such as the Devon Moth Group, is key to supporting a conservation sector which could not operate without them”.

Sadly, moths, like so much of our wildlife, are in serious decline. For example, populations of the V-Moth (not to be confused with the V-Pug) have crashed by 99% in Britain since the 1960s, while the stunning Garden Tiger, once a familiar sight to naturalists, has slumped by 92%.

How to get involved in moth recording

Rare Bedstraw Hawk-moth caterpillar spotted

A rare Bedstraw Hawk-moth (Hyles gallii) caterpillar was spotted in an Exmouth garden on 1st October. This impressive caterpillar, which can grow to 8cm in length, was feeding on Fuschia leaves. Adult moths of this species are scarce immigrants to Devon from continental Europe and two had been seen in early August, one in Chudleigh and the other in Seaton. Given the timing, the Exmouth caterpillar is probably the offspring of a female Bedstraw Hawk-moth that arrived on the south coast as part of the summer influx. (Photo by Jan Gannaway)

Moth Night 2019

Moth Night, the UK’s annual celebration of moths and moth recording, takes place on the nights of Thursday 26th – Saturday 28th September 2019. People in Devon and across the country are being asked to keep a particular eye out for the spectacular Clifden Nonpareil, a.k.a. Blue Underwing, which has recolonised southern Britain recently after going extinct in the 1960s.

In the last two years, this impressive moth, with a 12cm wingspan and bright blue stripe on its black hindwings, has been spotted across Devon during September, so Moth Night 2019 is the prefect opportunity to try to find one.

Devon Moth Group is holding a public event at Meeth Quarry Devon Wildlife Trust reserve on Friday night with hopes of seeing this special species.

This is the 20th anniversary of Moth Night so organisers Atropos, Butterfly Conservation and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology hope that it will be the biggest yet. You can take part by attending an event, running a moth trap at home or, even better, in a new location or by searching for moths using a torch, ivy blossom or ‘sugar’ (more information on how to find moths). Please submit any moth sightings from the three nights (26-28 September), whether from your garden or further afield, via the Moth Night website. Good luck!

Moth Night 2019 flier

Moth Night 2019 flier

2019 field meetings

The programme of Devon Moth Group outdoor meetings for the coming months is now available on the Events page.

Eight field meetings have been organised by our volunteer leaders and partner organisations. All of the events involve night-time moth trapping and are a great way to see new species, to experience the excitement of nocturnal moth recording in the company of experts and to help improve knowledge of the distributions and changing fortunes of Devon’s moths.

Moth Night 2012 event at Paignton Zoo
Devon Moth Group field meeting

Box-tree Moth arrives in Devon

The first examples of Box-tree Moth Cydalima perspectalis have been recorded in Devon. Former County Moth Recorder, Roy McCormicl, caught the first in his Teignmouth garden moth-trap on 3rd July 2018. Remarkably, a second one (image below) was caught only a couple of nights later (on 5th July 2018), by Graham Davey in Tavistock. The appearance of two individuals in such a short space of time but 30 miles apart, strongly suggests that these moths arrived under their own steam, either dipersing from elsewhere in southern England or immigrating from continental Europe.

Box-tree Moth Cydalima perspectalis (Graham Davey)

Box-tree Moth Cydalima perspectalis (Graham Davey)

The eventual arrival of this Asian species in Devon was expected, as it is spreading rapdily westwards and northwards across Britain, after the first record in Kent in 2007. The following year, it was recorded in Surrey and Sussex and by 2010, had been seen as far afield as Cambridgeshire and Gloucestershire. Since then, Box-tree Moth, caterpillars of which feed on (and can defoliate)the shrub Box, has been found in many counties, including Cornwall, Dorset and Somerset, sometimes seemingly as a result of natural spread, but often as a result of the horticultural trade. It is well established in the London area and can be very abundant; over 800 were recorded in a light-trap on one night in Putney recently.

Box-tree Moth is also present in continental Europe, where the first reports came from Germany in 2007. Since then it has been observed in Spain, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bulgaria, Romania and Greece. It is quite possible, therefore, that Box-tree Moth sightings, including those in Devon, may relate to immigration.

Thanks to Mark Parsons, Butterfly Conservation, for additional information about the spread of Box-tree Moth.