Migrants around!

Despite, or perhaps because of, the poor summer and succession of weather fronts sweeping in from the south-west, there are quite a lot of immigrant moths around at the moment. Many people have been catching good numbers of common migrants such as Silver Y, Udea ferrugalis and Nomophila noctuella, but there are more exciting immigrants around too.

Mike Braid recently caught a Beautiful Marbled near Chittlehampton in North Devon (VC4) (see image below), Richard Billington had a Striped Hawk-moth at Wembury, near Plymouth and Oliver Woodland recorded a Delicate and a Cosmopolitan at Membury, near Axminster. There have also been a number of Cydia amplana caught in the County.

Beautiful Marbled (Mike Braid)2

Beautiful Marbled (Mike Braid) caught in North Devon on night of 23 Aug 2012

Micro-moth new to Devon

Ethmia quadrillella, a smart-looking black and white micro-moth in the family Elachistidae (formerly in family Ethmiidae), was recorded by Peter Vernon at Colyford on 17th August 2012. This is a new county record for Devon – the species never having been recorded here before.

This moth is a scarce species (specifically listed as Nationally Scarce B) found as a resident mainly in eastern England from Kent up to Yorkshire, where it is typically found in wetland habitats. However, it is also known to occur as an occasional migrant or wanderer, so it is highly likely that this Devon individual had travelled either from eastern England or from Continental Europe. The sighting came during a period of considerable moth immigration.

Ethmia quadrillella (Peter Vernon)

Get involved in Moth Night 2012

This year’s national celebration of moths and moth recording takes place this week. For three days and nights, from Thursday 21st – Saturday 23rd June, moth recorders and the public will be out and about looking for moths across Devon, and the rest of the UK.

The theme this year is the moths of brownfield sites, so some people will search the abandoned quarries, disused railway lines and other wildlife-friendly brownfield sites in the county. Such sites are important for moths, butterflies and other wildlife, but generally under-recorded and often threatened with redevelopment.

Disused quarry

Disused quarry rich in wildlife

Anyone can get involved to help improve our knowledge of moths in the county and Moth Night 2012 is a great opportunity to make a start. Note down your sightings of moths, day or night, whether from your garden, a brownfield site or out in the countryside, and submit them to Moth Night via their easy-to-use website.

You can also come along to one of the events taking place in the county, where experts will be catching moths, to find out more about these beautiful insects.

For a list of events that are taking place, as well as how to submit your sightings, visit www.mothnight.info

Moth Night 2012 is organised by the wildlife magazine Atropos and the charity Butterfly Conservation, in association with the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology.