Record year

The Devon Moth Group Annual Report for 2017 has now been published and distributed to members. The report summarises a record-breaking number of sightings – nearly 64,000 moth records for the year submitted by over 220 Devon naturalists and visiting moth enthusiasts.

Highlights included records of three micro-moth species never previously recorded in the county, Lyonetia prunifoliella, Tuta absoluta and Coleophora alcyonipennella, the best ever year for Clifden Nonpareil and the joint best year for Jersey Mocha, both of which may now have colonised parts of Devon. Other exciting sightings included the first Large Red-belted Clearwing record for 20 years, the second and third ever Devon records of Little Thorn, the second ever record of the immigrant Golden Twin-spot and the first North Devon record of Mere Wainscot since 1960!

Many thanks to everyone who sent in 2017 sightings and to Barry Henwood, the County Moth Recorder, and his team of helpers for collating and verifying all the data! All of the records are shared with the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre and the National Moth Recording Scheme.

Annual Report 2017 cover

Devon Moth Group Annual Report 2017

Records resolution

Happy New Year from Devon Moth Group!

There are still a few moths on the wing, even at this time of year, including the aptly named Winter Moth (see image below taken on the evening of 29th December 2017), but mainly this is the season for sorting out and submitting all your moth records from the year gone by.

Any sightings of moths in Devon are useful and will, after checking, go into the Devon Moth Group database to increase knowledge and support the conservation of these important insects. All of the data are also shared with the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre, Devon Wildlife Trust and the National Moth Recording Scheme run by Butterfly Conservation.

So if it is not too late for New Year’s resolution, why not make it your mission to submit some sightings. There is information about how to log and send your moth records and, if you get them in before 14 January, your records will feature in the 2017 Devon Moth Group Annual Report. If you can’t make that deadline, just forward your records on when you can – we’ll always be grateful to receive them!

Winter Moth on window

Winter Moth on window (Richard Fox)

The Moth beyond compare

September has been an amazing month for one rare moth in Devon. Catocala fraxini, which has the wonderful english name Clifden Nonpareil (nonpareil meaning unparalleled or beyond compare), is a rare immigrant species, usually only seen once or twice a year in the county. According to the Devon Moth Group database, the best ever year here for Clifden Nonpareil was 2007, when there were three sightings. Last year there was just one and 2015 yielded two.

However, during September 2017, six records (of a total of seven individual moths) have already been reported in Devon. These have occurred throughout the month (from the 4th to the 27th) and right across the south of the county from Axminster in the east to Bere Alston in the Tamar Valley in the west. One lucky recorder, Nick Roach, found two at once, one in his garden moth trap and another on the wall of his house.

This impressive moth, with a wingspan approaching 10 cm and a stunning violet-blue band on the hindwings (giving rise to the alternative vernacular name of Blue Underwing) is currently colonising several areas of southern England and is regularly caught nowadays in parts of Dorset, indicating the presence of resident populations.

With luck, the big increase in sightings in Devon this autumn may also herald the arrival of local breeding colonies of this wonderful insect.

Clifden Nonpareil (Nick Roach)

Clifden Nonpareil seen near Culmstock on 26th September 2017 (Nick Roach)

Clifden Nonpareil (Nick Roach)

New macro-moth checklist published

A list of all the species of larger (macro-) moths that have ever been recorded in Devon has been produced and is now available online. The list includes a total of 661 species, some residents others immigrant visitors, which comprises around two-thirds of the total number of macro-moths ever recorded in Britain and Ireland.

South Devon (Vice-county 3) has a total of 657 species recorded, but 26 of these have not been seen since at least 1960, so are either extinct former residents or rare migrants.

North Devon (Vice-county 4) has a shorter list of 575 macro-moth species with 21 not recorded since 1960.

While some moths have been lost from Devon, new species continue to be recorded, either as immigrants from overseas or due to spread from existing populations in neighboroughing counties. Recent additions include Jersey Mocha (Cyclophora ruficiliaria), first recorded in 2011, and Sombre Brocade (Dichonioxa tenebrosa), first seen in 2015, both of which may now be established in the county.

The new checklist was produced by Devon Moth Group Council member Phil Dean, assisted by County Recorder Barry Henwood, using information from the Group’s sightings database and from the 2001 book The Moths of Devon by Roy McCormick.

Scarce Silver-lines (Patrick Clement)

2015 Annual Report published

Devon Moth Group members should have now received their copy of the 2015 Annual Report, which was published in late March.

Drawing on 42,000 moth records submitted during 2015, the Annual Report presents an overview of important sightings, analysis and a comprehensive species list.

Perhaps reflecting the lacklustre weather from late spring to early autumn, 2015 didn’t seem to be a vintage year for our resident moths. However, it was certainly an excellent year for immigration. Major early summer influxes of species such as Striped Hawk-moth, Small Mottled Willow and Bordered Straw, were accompanied by rarities such as Purple Marbled and Many-lined. The excitement continued in July and August with records of Jersey Mocha, Spurge Hawk-moth, Orache Moth, Splendid Brocade and Four-spotted. By the high standards of 2015, September was relatively quiet, but October yielded the first ever Devon record of Tunbridge Wells Gem and rarities such as Flame Brocade, Crimson Speckled and Clifden Nonpareil. And then the year ended on a high, during the unseasonally warm December (17.2°C was recorded at Teignmouth on 16th December), with the first ever county records of Syncopacma polychromella and Cornifrons ulceratalis, as well as sightings of Euchromius ocellea and Spoladea recurvalis among impressive numbers of more common immigrants.

DMG Report cover 2015_1

Mid-winter migrants

2015 was an astonishing year for migrant moths in the county and concluded in style with the appearance of another species new to Devon. The incredibly mild, and often strong, southerly winds that dominated December’s weather continued to bring a host of migrant moths to our shores.

One very small visitor was of particular significance. Syncopacma polychromella, is a tiny but distinctive Gelechiid micro-moth with a wingspan of only 7mm or so.It occurs in southern Europe, Africa and the Middle East and has only been recorded in Great Britain on a handful of occasions prior to December, and never in Devon.

That all changed on 16 December 2015, when visiting moth recorder Dave Grundy caught a S.polychromella at Prawle Point, the first ever Devon record. Amazingly, the following night, two more examples were caught in the county: one by Mike Braid at Chittlehampton, south of Barnstaple, and thus the first ever record of this species in VC4 (North Devon) and the other by Richard Fox at Abbotskerswell near Newton Abbot. These latter two records were both from garden moth traps.

The three Devon records of S.polychromella formed part of an unprecedented influx of this species into Britain during the week before Christmas. In all, over 60 sightings have been reported so far, mainly from south-coast counties but also from inland locations such as Surrey and north Wiltshire.

Just goes to show that you should never pack your moth trap away for the winter!

Syncopacma polychromella (Abbotskerswell 17 Dec 2015) (Richard Fox)

Syncopacma polychromella (Abbotskerswell 17 Dec 2015) (Richard Fox)

Syncopacma polychromella (Chittlehampton, 17 Dec 2015) (Mike Braid)

Syncopacma polychromella (Chittlehampton, 17 Dec 2015) (Mike Braid)

Tunbridge Wells in Devon!?

Migrants have dominated the Devon moth news during 2015 and recent months have been no exception. The undoubted highlight of the autumn was Devon’s first ever Tunbridge Wells Gem (Chrysodeixis acuta), shown in the photo below. This is a rare immigrant that had been recorded on only 20 occasions ever in the whole of Britain and Ireland prior to 2015.

This exciting new addition to the Devon moth list was caught by Phil Barden on the coast near Noss Mayo on 7 October 2015.

Tunbridge Wells Gem (Phil Barden)

Tunbridge Wells Gem (Phil Barden)

Marvellous migrants

2015 is shaping up to be a record year for moth immigration into Great Britain. Although the peak time of year for moth arrivals is autumn, there have already been substantial influxes from southern Europe.

Three species, in particular, have featured prominently both here in Devon and across the south during May and June; Bordered Straw (Heliothis peltigera), Small Mottled Willow (Spodoptera exigua) and Striped Hawk-moth (Hyles livornica). More recently, Small Marbled (Eublemma parva) has arrived in (relative) abundance. None are rare visitors, but the numbers seen so far this year, particularly of the first two species, are likely to break previous records.

Many moth recorders in Devon will have recorded at least one Bordered Straw and Small Mottled Willow this year, but only a lucky few have seen the stunning Striped Hawk-moth. One recorder, Mark Marshall, has had a great run of fortune, recording two Striped Hawk-moths and an Orache Moth (Trachea atriplicis), a scarce immigrant, at his home near Blackawton in the South Hams.

There’s little sign of an end to the migrant activity so keep recording and good luck!

Striped Hawk-moth at Blackawton 13 June 2015 (Mark Marshall)

Striped Hawk-moth at Blackawton 13 June 2015 (Mark Marshall)

Bordered Straw at Abbotskerswell on 4 June 2015 (Richard Fox)

Bordered Straw at Abbotskerswell on 4 June 2015 (Richard Fox)

Accent Gem – 2nd British record

An ultra-rare immigrant moth, the Accent Gem Ctenoplusia accentifera, has been spotted in Devon. This African species has only been recorded in Britain once before , way back in 1969 in Kent, so the discovery is very significant.

Devon Moth Group member, Dave Wall, found the moth in his garden moth trap in Exmouth on 29 October, during a major period of moth immigration to the southern coast of Britain that accompanied very mild weather and southerly winds. In fact, in the same moth trap, Dave also caught two Palpita vitrealis and three Vestal Rhodometra sacraria, quite exciting immigrant moths themselves.

This is the second extremely rare migrant moth caught in Devon in recent months. Back in July, Group members found a Ringed Border Stegania cararia, which was also a species never seen before in Devon and was only the third known British record.

Accent Gem caught at Exmouth 29 Oct 2014 (image by Barry Henwood)_1

Migration month

Autumn can be a time of great excitement for Devon’s moth recorders as moth migrate northwards from the continent and arrive on our shores. In some years, little arrives but in others (most recently 2013 and 2011) an amazing variety of common, scarce and downright rare immigrant moths come in, to the delight of wildlife enthusiasts.

So far this year, most of the migrant moth excitement has been among moth recorders on the east coast of Britain. However, the South West hasn’t missed out entirely. Perhaps the pick of the crop so far have been two records of the large and dramatic Clifden Nonpareil (Catocala fraxini) – a moth that would feature on most moth recorders’ bucket lists. The first was caught by visiting moth expert Dave Grundy at Prawle Point on 27 August, while the second came to Mike Lockyear’s moth trap in Crediton on 17 September. Both are shown below. The species has also been reported from other locations around the English coast from Dorset to Northumberland in the past few weeks.

A range of other immigrants have been seen in Devon in recent weeks including the massive Convolvulous Hawk-moth, Delicate, Vestal, Scarce Bordered Straw and Ostrinia nubilalis.

With mild conditions forecast for the week ahead, it would be well worth looking out for rare visitors to our county.

Clifden Nonpareil (Dave Grundy)

Clifden Nonpareil (Dave Grundy)

Clifden Nonpareil (Mike Lockyear)

Clifden Nonpareil (Mike Lockyear)