Horse-chestnut Leaf Miner invasion

One of the most noticeable of all new species that have arrived and colonised Britain this century has been Cameraria ohridella, the Horse-chestnut Leaf Miner. It was first recording in Britain in 2002 in London but has spread like wildfire since then, reaching Devon in 2007.

Cameraria ohridella (Dave Green)

Cameraria ohridella (Dave Green)

A new study, published this month in the international journal Public Library of Science One, shows the rapid spread of the micro-moth in the UK using information from members of the public. Interestingly, the study recorded a response by parasitiods to the arrival of C.ohridella. The full report is available to read here.

Not surprisingly, given the very obvious feeding damage caused by the moth, the public and media have been very concerned about the welfare of British Horse Chestnut trees. However, another scientific study published last year looked at the impacts of C.ohridella on the health of infected trees. The news is rather surprising and can be found here.

At this time of year, C.ohridella is in the pupal stage, hidden away among the dead leaves around the Horse Chestnut trees that they inhabit, but come early summer their distinctive leaf mines will be visible on trees across the County.

Horse-chestnut Leaf Miner damage (Richard Fox)

Horse-chestnut Leaf Miner damage (Richard Fox)